WITH AXE AND HATCHET

Which forestry tool is best suited for which task? Learn the differences and get to know the similarities.

MAKE THE RIGHT CHOICE

You can trim trees, cut back rampant bushes, split firewood, and even carve with both axes and hatchets. Apart from their significant similarities, they still differ in usage. Whichever type it is best to choose is not a matter of personal preference, but of the application and purpose.

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Brothers in spirit
- Making axes and hatchets

1

THE BLADE

1. Toe
2. Heel
3. Cutting edge
4. Cutter
5. Blade
6. Cheek

2

THE HEAD

7. House
8. Eye
9. Neck/Striking plate

3

THE HANDLE

10. Head
11. Sliding Piece
12. Hand Piece
13. Grip

Components

The right edge

The cutting angle of hatchets is usually lower than that of axes. But it is not just the angle that determines the cutting edge's performance, but also the cutting edge type. All OCHSENKOPF axes and hatchets are provided with a convex edge. The advantages are obvious: a convex edge does not have the optical sharpness of a knife edge, but as a result it does not need to be sharpened as often - this increases the cutting edge service life and thus the life of the tool.

 

A question of the handle

The handle may be made of ash, or better hickory. The handle end in pommel or cow-foot form ensures a secure grip, preventing the axe or hatchet from slipping out of your hands.

For a firm grip

The part which connects the axe blade and handle is called the head. These two can only form a unit with a wedge. Our ring wedges distribute the clamping force, and also provide support in the direction of movement.

A special exception

All-steel hatchets are the exception, since the handle and wedge are one piece.

A LOOK AT THE DETAIL

COMPACT AND LIGHT - THE HATCHET

If you are only going to hack a few small logs or kindling for a campfire, or a few smaller
branches or shrubs in the garden, you don't always need to have large axe on hand. A hatchet is perfectly adequate for these purposes. To this end there is a classic wooden handle hatchet or sturdy all-steel hatchet, whereby the head and handle are forged as one piece. All-steel hatchets, also called camping hatchets, can also be used for hammering tent pegs.  

Hatchets have a short handle (up to about 40 cm), a relatively small cutting angle, and due to their size are significantly lighter. You can easily split smaller logs with one hand, or trim branches and twigs from the trunk.

EFFICIENT AND POWERFUL - THE AXE

If larger, more massive pieces of wood require more clout, it's time for an axe. Due to the greater weight and the longer handle, the stroke has much more force than with a hatchet. In order to
fully benefit from the axe's significant difference in length in comparison to the hatchet, you simply handle the axe with both hands and swing it from over your shoulder or head - thus maximising the force at every stroke. By contrast with a hatchet, the axe is more difficult to direct and is more tiring to use, but this can be compensated for with optimum cutting performance and transfer of force.

As a special comparison, there is the OCHSENKOPF Universal Gold Axe. The name says it all - it's a true Jack of all trades. Unlike any other axe, it is suited for all applications you might also use a hatchet for. The shape of the axe blade with the thin edge is equally suitable for light felling, trimming, and log-splitting work, and means you don't have to change axes for different uses.

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